China, Surrogacy

China – Court Orders Mother To Return $1.4 Million in Surrogacy Money

Source Sixth Tone

A court in China’s central Hunan province has ordered a woman to return the money she received for her surrogacy — a controversial case that highlights the murky legalities in the country surrounding the practice.

In a verdict announced last month but only made public Friday, the Tianxin District People’s Court in Changsha demanded Zeng Meili return the 10 million yuan ($1.44 million) from Peng Shimin — both pseudonyms used by the court due to privacy concerns — for delivering twin boys in 2013. Peng’s wife had filed a lawsuit against Zeng and her husband in 2016 asking the court to retrieve the money Peng spent from their joint financial account. The wife said she was unaware of the surrogacy as well as the birth of the twins.

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China, Surrogacy, Surrogate Mother

More local surrogates are having Chinese babies thanks to an international business deal

Source Colorado Springs Independent

Like all countries, China is home to folks who long for a child but can’t (or don’t want to) become pregnant. Now, Colorado Springs may offer them a solution.

In November of 2016, Branda Hebert tells the Indy, a man and woman arrived from Beijing just in time to see her give birth to their baby.

“That’s my most favorite time, is when the baby’s born, and they’re watching, and they see their kid for the first time,” she says. “And the look on their faces, you can tell that they’re in love.”

Hebert, a Kum & Go manager who’s now 35, says that was her second time working as a gestational carrier, something she gets paid for but does mostly because she “loves being pregnant,” and helping people who can’t make a baby themselves. She says carrying a child for the Chinese couple wasn’t much different from her first surrogacy for a couple in Texas — other than the distance and language barrier, which wasn’t something email and Google Translate couldn’t fix.

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China, IVF

Parental hopefuls seek fertile ground overseas

Source ECNS.com

The easing of China’s family planning policy was a boon for Zhang Yinhe and his wife Xu Mengsha, who had decided to freeze an embryo for use during in vitro fertilization in the hope of having a second child someday.

However, in China most IVF procedures are restricted to infertile couples, and reproductive clinics have been overwhelmed with hopeful couples since the family planning policy was scrapped two years ago, which meant Zhang and Xu faced a long wait before they could have the procedure.

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China, Sperm Donor

Chinese sperm bank: Donors must ‘love socialist motherland’

Source MassLive

If you want to donate sperm at one Chinese hospital, get ready to pledge support to the Communist Party.
According to the BBC, quoting various media sources, a statement Wednesday on a since deleted website of Peking University Third Hospital in Beijing, said donors to its sperm bank must “love the socialist motherland.”
This was translated to mean “support the leadership of the Communist Party, be loyal to the party’s cause and be decent, law-abiding citizens, free of political problems.”

U.S. sperm banks ask many non-genetic based questions of donors, such as hobbies and goals, but party affiliation may be a first one for such screening anywhere.

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China, Surrogacy, Surrogate Mother

China – Surrogate motherhood becomes a family industry in poor Chinese villages

Source:  Yahoo

Poor villagers in central China are making more than 100,000 yuan (US$15,000) by acting as surrogate mothers, a Chinese news site has reported.

In some areas, most women of child bearing age had been hiring out their wombs, even though the practice was illegal, Thepaper.cn reported on Saturday.

The news portal’s investigation highlighted the case of a village in Hubei province, where more than 100 women were bearing the fertilised eggs of couples they had never met.

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China, Surrogacy, Surrogate Mother

Chinese black-market surrogacy is booming

Source:  BioEdge

Fueled by high demand and high rewards, black-market surrogacy is booming in China, The Times (London) reports. Its source is The Paper, a state-run news website, which carried out a two-month-long investigation.

Agents charge commissioning couples anywhere between US$55,000 and $155,000 for a baby, gender guaranteed. It is also risky, especially if there are problems with the pregnancy or if the baby is disabled.

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