Commercial Surrogacy

The contradictions of commercial surrogacy

Source BioEdge

Commercial surrogacy contains inherent contradictions about the status of the mother, according to an article in the Journal of Medical Ethics. Jennifer Parks and Timothy Murphy, two American bioethicists, focus on times when the person or persons who commissioned the pregnancy abandon the child. This has happened in a number of widely-publicised cases overseas and in the US. Most of the time, the mother is left with responsibility for the baby, even if it is disabled.

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Commercial Surrogacy, India, Parental rights, Surrogacy Law, Surrogate Mother

India – Surrogacy Regulation is Stuck Between Market, Family and State

Source The Wire

Through the years, India’s stand on surrogacy has varied from a medico-liberal to a carceral model, but the best safeguards for surrogates would be empowerment rather than relying on the market or the state for protection.

Surrogacy policy in India has varied from encouraging commercial surrogacy to allowing only altruistic surrogacy, a move that was condemned by a parliamentary standing committee Credit: Reuters

Law has long been the site of intense political, social and economic contest over women’s reproductive labour. Surrogacy is no exception. Over the past 15 years, numerous legislative drafts on surrogacy have been proposed, making India possibly the only country in the world to seriously consider all possible regulatory approaches to surrogacy ranging from a liberal, contract-based model in the late 1990s to a prohibitionist, carceral model in 2016.
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Commercial Surrogacy, compensation, Surrogacy, Surrogacy Law, UK

UK – Government Advises Openness, Confidence, And Transparency (In Surrogacy)

Source Above The Law

The UK — not the US, sorry — has a very thoughtful and vocal stance on surrogacy.

Last month, the government issued thoughtful guidance on best practices for citizens considering entering into a surrogacy arrangement. Our government? No, no, sorry for any confusion. I am talking about the United Kingdom. The United States continues to maintain a patchwork of (mostly positive) surrogacy laws, or in many cases, no law at all. But the UK’s government, and more specifically, the Department of Health and Social Care, recently issued official guidance for intended parents and surrogates entering into surrogacy arrangements in England and Wales.

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Canada, Commercial Surrogacy, Gestational carrier agreements, intended parents, Surrogacy, Surrogacy Law, Surrogate Mother

Paying a surrogate in Canada is illegal but one Liberal MP wants to change that

Source Global News

Paying a surrogate mother for her services is illegal in Canada but one Liberal MP wants to change that.

When most Canadians picture criminals, a couple trying to have a baby probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind.

But under Canadian law, that’s exactly what couples who pay a surrogate to carry their child to term are deemed to be, and one Liberal MP wants to change that.

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Commercial Surrogacy, compensation, Surrogacy Law, Surrogate Mother

Turning Women And Babies Into Merchandise

Source Sky Watch TV –

On March 12, the governor of Washington signed into law a bill amending the state’s Uniform Parentage Act. This act officially permits women to be paid for carrying someone else’s child—in other words, “surrogate motherhood.” Previously, the law only permitted women to be reimbursed for medical and other expenses associated with surrogacy. The amendment, in effect, legalizes commercial surrogacy. So women can now rent out their wombs in Washington State. Sponsors of the bill insisted that the goal of the legislation is to reduce the suffering of infertile couples. But its real-world result will be to further commodify human life and exploit desperate women.

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Assisted Reproductive Technology, Commercial Surrogacy, India, Surrogacy, Surrogacy Law, Surrogate Mother

India – Cabinet Approves Amendments to Surrogacy Bill

Source: India West

Twenty-eight-year-old Indian surrogate mother, Manu Kani poses at the Surrogacy Center India clinic in New Delhi, Nov. 3, 2015. The Union Cabinet March 21 approved amending the Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill, 2016. (Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images)

NEW DELHI — The Union Cabinet, chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, March 21 approved amending the Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill, 2016 to provide for rights of a child born through surrogacy equal to those of a natural or biological child, and mandate the registration of surrogacy clinics with the appropriate state authorities.

The amendments also seek 16 months of extended insurance coverage for surrogate mothers to cover all complications, as well as a strict clause to safeguard the surrogate mother from exploitation, the Union Health Ministry said.

Also, Assisted Reproductive Technology has been kept out of the Bill’s purview, it added.

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