Malta, Surrogacy Law

Malta – Common sense has prevailed

Source Times of Malta

A child born as a result of gamete donation will have a right to know the identity of his biological mother and father at the age of 18. Photo: Shutterstock

Thankfully it seems like common sense has prevailed regarding the amendments to the Embryo Protection Act. There are three main fundamental improvements to the original Bill.

The first is that a child born as a result of gamete donation will have a right to know the identity of his biological mother and father at the age of 18.

The second is that the parents of frozen embryos will be given an additional IVF cycle, free of charge, to give all embryos the chance to be brought to term. This is certainly an improvement over the original Bill; however this should be further strengthened with a legal obligation to do so within a two-year period unless a medical condition precludes this. This will significantly reduce the number of embryos that will be ‘up for adoption’, which should only be exceptional cases – preferably none at all.

The third amendment is that the regulation of altruistic surrogacy is going to be discussed in a separate Act of Parliament, rather than through a legal notice subsidiary to the Embryo Protection Act. The surrogate mother will be given all the support she needs while respecting the rights of the biological gamete owners.

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